Effets d'un programme d'entraînement locomoteur de 6 semaines avec exosquelette robotisé offert à des personnes ayant une lésion complète de la moelle épinière et utilisant un fauteuil roulant comme principal mode de locomotion : Une étude de faisabilité liée à la rédaction d'une demande de financement

 

Dany Gagnon

Institut de réadaptation Gingras-Lindsay-de-Montréal

 

Domaine : appareil locomoteur et arthrite

Consortium pour le développement de la recherche en traumatologie - volet 2

Concours 2015-2016

Many individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI) use a powered or manually propelled wheelchair as their primary mode of mobility. As a result, they often adopt a sedentary lifestyle and develop complications or exacerbate complex secondary health conditions. Among these, musculoskeletal, metabolic and cardiorespiratory secondary health conditions and complications need attention. Recently-developed robotic exoskeletal systems may offer a promising therapeutic alternative to increase lower extremity weight-bearing and physical activity needed to overcome these secondary health conditions or complications. Only a few studies on robotic exoskeletal walking systems and their potential effectiveness, all with limited evidence, are currently available.

The main objectives of this feasibility study are 1) to quantify physical exertion during a locomotor training program with a robotic exoskeletal system to determine the best parameters to expect from training effects and 2) to investigate the immediate effects on muscular and bone health, metabolic and cardiorespiratory health, and biopsychosocial health. Five adults with a motor–complete, traumatic SCI who use a wheelchair as their primary mode of mobility will complete a 6-week, supervised locomotor training program with a robotic exoskeletal system (3 times/week). Before and after the locomotor training programs, comprehensive clinical and laboratory outcome measures will evaluate walking ability with the exoskeleton system, muscles and bone health, metabolic and cardiorespiratory health, biopsychological health, as well as satisfaction and future perspectives. Non-parametric descriptive statistics will be calculated for most participant characteristics and for the clinical and laboratory outcome measures collected before and after the locomotor training program. Percentage of change greater than a 10 percent threshold will suggest that the proposed locomotor training program is likely to be an effective rehabilitation intervention. This new evidence is a crucial first step toward the development of a large-scale, clinically relevant and scientifically robust clinical randomized trial.