Essais randomisés chez les patients hémodialysés : Améliorer les issues centrées sur le patient et le risques cardiovasculaire

 

Rita Suri

Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal [CHUM]

 

Domaine : santé circulatoire et respiratoire

Programme Chercheurs-boursiers cliniciens - Junior 2

Concours 2019-2020

The kidneys are responsible for removing wastes and excess water from the body.  There are approximately 40,000 Canadians with end-stage kidney failure.  Most of these patients are treated with hemodialysis to stay alive.  Hemodialysis removes waste and water from the blood, but is not a perfect treatment.  Many patients receiving hemodialysis have serious symptoms, high blood pressure, heart disease, poor quality of life, and high risk of being hospitalised or dying.  Clinical trials are needed to improve this situation.  Unfortunately, there are currently not enough clinical trials to aid the health the care team to make recommendations on which treatments are best suited for hemodialysis patients.

Dr. Suri's research program is focused on conducting clinical trials to test treatments that will help improve the quality of life and survival of patients receiving hemodialysis.  She will conduct a trial to determine if an individually prescribed exercise program using special equipment (Nordic walking poles) can increase physical activity and strength, and eventually decrease the risk of failing and being hospitalised for dialysis patients.  In addition, she is planning a trial to test the optimal strategy that will control high blood pressure and reduce heart disease, while at the same time prevent low blood pressure and debilitating symptoms during dialysis.  Finally, through the Canadian Nephrology Trials Network, she will work with team members to engage patients to help design more patient -centered clinical trials.  This will ensure that nephrologists conduct trials that directly address the problems patients feel are most important to them, as well as help to increase patient participation in these studies.